Sunday, 16 June 2013

Caterpillar id

A small caterpillar daring to live under a blue tit nestbox in an oakwood near Tregaron today.  I only have Manley so would be grateful if someone with Porter could have a look.  Caterpillars with this type of bristle seem to be butterflies. I should have used flash as it was so dark in the wood but was struggling to hang on to the tree as the nestbox was placed awkwardly (by me of course) and operate the camera.  For my pains I managed to get peppered by box fleas and am now in quarantine.

7 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. What a beautiful little caterpillar! I have been through Porter without success. I suspect this is an early instar and so not represented. Perhaps you could sent it to Ispot and see if anyone can ID it?
    Carolyn.

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  3. Try Reg Fry's website: http://www.ukleps.org/

    Failing that mail the images to him. reg.a.fry@btinternet.com

    Enjoy your fleas, I'm covered in midge bites from 2 nights ago
    Let me know what he says please.

    Regards
    Peter

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  4. Reg has said it is an oak sawfly larva. ispot website has the very pic and labelled it Periclista pubescens because the bristle splits three-quarters up its length whereas another one, P. lineolata, splits halfway.
    Reg's wbsite mentioned by Peter above contains a very useful section on how to start id'ing caterpillars: thoroughly recommended.

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  5. NOT good news for your oak trees! When previously researching the sawflies on the iris by our pond I learnt that sawfly larvae have a pair of legs on almost every segment but in caterpillars there is always a gap between the thoracic legs and prolegs with at least two and up to five of the intervening abdominal segments having no legs at all. I think now the difference can be made out on your photograph.
    Carolyn.

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  6. Yes I now know to photograph the legs!

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