Sunday, 3 November 2013

Five-spot Burnets

Can anyone help me with identifying whether these are Zygaena trifolii or Zygaena lonicerae, or is it just not possible?  They were all photographed in the same area of Aberporth.  The top 3 were recorded together on 5th July 2012 and the other 2 were on 26th June (showing unmerged 3rd and 4th spots) and 17th July this year.

Five-spot Burnets

4 comments:

  1. I think the only safe way is to rear them from a larva. If it helps my guess would be all Five spot as from what I can see of the hind wing the borders look quite broad & merged middle spots are more common in Five spot. We need a master class in Burnet moths I think. Records for Narrow-bordered seem to be more in the north. Evan may be able to produce a map if we ask him nicely.

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  2. Thanks - that stopped me going round in circles. I had another read of articles on the internet taking your info into account. I think, based on known colony areas, wing-shape and that most have merged spots, the likelyhood is that they are Five-spot and not Narrow-bordered. Thanks again!

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  3. The new Day-Flying moths of Britain(Wild Guides Newland, Still and Swash) states that the NB 5 spot is the more common but not from a Welsh perspective as their distribution maps show.

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  4. For NB5SB the middle spots are almost always separate. For 5SB they are more often merged. In addition for 5SB there are usually some reddish scales between these spots when they are separate and the third spot is half the size of the 4th. Finally the NB5SB flies earlier in the year - June to July versus July to August. Although timings in Wales may differ slightly. Yours all look like 5SB's.

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